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Monday, April 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville) found in the catalog.

Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville)

Charles J. Cole

Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville)

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Published by American Museum of Natural History in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • North America
    • Subjects:
    • Tantilla -- Classification.,
    • Tantilla planiceps -- Classification.,
    • Reptiles -- Classification.,
    • Reptiles -- North America -- Classification.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 280-284.

      StatementCharles J. Cole, Laurence M. Hardy.
      SeriesBulletin of the American Museum of Natural History,, v. 171, article 3
      ContributionsHardy, Laurence M.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQH1 .A4 vol. 171, art. 3, QL666.O636 .A4 vol. 171, art. 3
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. 201-284 :
      Number of Pages284
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3522567M
      LC Control Number82106658

      The Tamaulipan or lowland element of the fauna is smaller (18 species, 27%) but includes 4 Basin endemics (Trionyx ater, Terrapene coahuila, Pseudemys scripta taylori, Scincella lateralis ssp.). Five of the Tamaulipan species have distributions that skirt the arid northern Mexican Plateau around the margin of the Gulf of México, and extend to or into the Basin via the drainage of the Río Salado. Cole, Charles J. & Laurence M. Hardy. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (3) Cole, Gerald A. The American Southwest and Middle America. Pp. , in David G. Frey (ed.). Limnology in North America. snakes and their relationships with climate and fe-male reproductive cycles. Herpetologica, STEBBINS, R. C. Amphibians and reptiles of western North America. McGraw-Hill Book Com-pany, New York, pp A field guide to western reptiles and amphibians. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. VOLSOE, H. Structure and.


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Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville) by Charles J. Cole Download PDF EPUB FB2

Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bulletin of the AMNH ; v.article 3. Get this from a library.

Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). [Charles J Cole; Laurence M Hardy]. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville).

Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. article 3 The most useful characters for distinguishing species of Tantilla, particularly in North America, appear to be in the hemipenes and head coloration.

Hereafter, all taxonomic studies within Tantilla routinely Author: Charles J. Cole and Laurence M. Hardy. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville).

Bulletin of the AMNH ; v.article 3 By Charles J. Cole and Laurence M. HardyAuthor: Charles J. Cole and Laurence M. Hardy. Cole, Charles J. and Laurence M. Hardy () Tantilla planiceps.: Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles.

(): Cole, Charles J.; Hardy, Laurence M. () Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Smith’s Black-headed Snake is most likely to be confused with the three other Tantilla in Arizona and a form of the Western Groundsnake (Sonora semiannulata) that resembles Tantilla.

In the Mile Circle, that latter snake is known from the Phoenix area. It has loreal scales, lacks the orange, red. Cole, Charles J. and Laurence M. Hardy Tantilla planiceps. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles.

Cole, Charles J.; Hardy, Laurence M. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Laurence M. A desert subspecies of the snake Tantilla eiseni. Transactions of the San Common Names: E: Western Blackhead Snake, G: Westliche Schwarzkopfschlange.

Notes and comments on certain American and Mexican snakes of the genus Tantilla, with descriptions of new species. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 39 []: - get paper here Van Denburgh,J. Sexual dimorphism in snake tail length: sexual selection, natural selection, or morphological constraint.

Systematics of North Amrican colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville) Reproductive behavior of the rat snakes of eastern North America, genus Cited by: Systematics of. the North American colubrid snakes related to.

Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bulletin of the. American Museum of Natural History –. COLUBRIDAE (colubrid snakes) The Colubrid snakes are sometimes refered to as "typical snakes".

They comprise the largest family by far with over species worldwide. Most are medium sized snakes, and all lack a pelvic girdle and have no vestigial hind limbs and whose left lung is either absent or greatly reduced. Colubridae is a family of snakes.

With genera, it is the largest snake family. The earliest species of the family date back to the Oligocene epoch. Colubrid snakes are found on Class: Reptilia. Description. The Chihuahuan Black-headed Snake (Tantilla wilcoxi) was described by Leonhard Stejneger () of the Smithsonian Institution from a juvenile male collected by Timothy E.

Wilcox M.D. at Fort Huachuca in (USNM ). Based primarily on variation in numbers of ventral and subcaudal scales, Smith () described two subspecies. Natural History of a Terrestrial Hispaniolan Anole: Anolis barbouri.

North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla. North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla. The colubrid snake genus Tantilla currently consists of 62 species with a coast-to-coast distribution in the mid- and southern regions of the United States, throughout most of Mexico and Central America, and in South America as far south as southern Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay, and northern Argentina (Wilson, b, ; Townsend et al., Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps Amphibians and reptiles of western North America.

McGraw‐Hill Book Company, New York. Microsoft Word - References for Species Accounts final Author: twellsFile Size: KB. Color pattern of head and neck of Tantilla planiceps; upper, American Museum of Natural Historyfrom Baja California Sur; lower, American Museum of Natural Historyof North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla plan­ North America.

McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, Toronto, and London. xxii + p. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bull AMNH, v. article 3 Coleman K., Rothfuss L. A., Ota H., Kardong K. Kinematics of egg-eating by the specialized Taiwan snake Oligodon formosanus (Colubridae).

NOTES ON A COLUBRID SNAKE, TANTILLA VERMIFORMIS, FROM CENTRAL AMERICA. Van Devander, Robert W & Cole, Charles J SYSTEMATICS OF NORTH AMERICAN COLUBRID SNAKES RELATED TO Tantilla planiceps (Blainville) Cole, Charles J., L.M.

Hardy Condition: Used: Good. rebound former library bound in hard casing Memoir 11 withdrawn stamp in book. This species formerly was included as a subspecies of Tantilla planiceps, which at that time was circumscribed differently than it is name Tantilla atriceps has been applied to various populations of other Tantilla species (e.g., Tantilla hobartsmithi).See Cole and Hardy () for discussion of systematics.

Cole, C.J., and L.M. Hardy. Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (3): – Google ScholarAuthor: Charles J.

Cole, Laurence M. Hardy. Tantilla planiceps (not of Blainville): Stejneger and Barbour, (part). Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla plan­ North America.

McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, Toronto, and London. xxii + p A field guide to western reptiles and amphibians. C. J Coleand L. M Hardy Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History – Google ScholarCited by: 8.

of 18 results for "tantilla" Skip to main search results Amazon Prime. Tantilla melanocephala. Jump to navigation Jump to search. Tantilla melanocephala, commonly known as the black-headed snake, is a species of small Family: Colubridae.

Tantilla atriceps is a thin snake, being no thicker than a pencil, with adult lengths ranging between cm ( in). General Distribution: The U.S. range of Tantilla atriceps is restricted to two counties (Kleburg and Duval) in south Texas. In Mexico, it is found from central Coahuila south to San Luis Potosi, with isolated populations.

Smith's black-headed snake is an uncommon species found in California in. Inyo, San Bernardino, Kings and Tulare cos. Recently redescribed (Cole and Hardy ), the species may be more widespread and common but few data are available. A Field Guide to Snakes of California; Crother, B.

(ed.) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding, Eighth Edition; Ernst, C. H., Ernst, E. Snakes of the United States and Canada; Lemm, J.

Tiger Rat Snake Spilotes pullatus Tiger Rat Snake attain almost 3 m in length and climb tall trees with astonishing skills; they feed on lizards, birds, and mammals as large as squirrels. Western Black-headed Snake Tantilla planiceps Black-headed snakes often have two possible functional fangs at the back of each upper jaw.

They immobilize. North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville). Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. MYERS, C. W The systematics of Rhadinaea (Co-lubridae), a genus of New World snakes. Bull. Sierra de Neiba and Cordillera Central of the North Island (Schwartz and Henderson, ).

Much of the. Colubrids either chase their prey or wait and ambush it. Many kill by constriction, while others inject venom using fangs at the back of the mouth.

The majority of colubrids lay eggs, although some give birth to live young. In Canada, red-sided garter snakes gather by the thousands to spend the winter in underground dens. About these tables For the most part, the scientific names and related species codes are based on Collins (1 ) or Hammerson Systematics of North American colubrid snakes related to Tantilla planiceps (Blainville).

Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 1 7 1 (3): 1 Colorado Division of Wildlife. Few alethinophidian snakes prey on arthropods, but the colubrines include the largest radiation of arthropod-eating snakes, the sonorines, with about a dozen genera, including the North American groundsnakes (Sonora), black-headed snakes (Tantilla), and shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactis).

Sonorines are broadly distributed throughout the Americas. The indigo snake, a member of the colubrid family of snakes, is the (unofficially) longest snake in North America, with the longest recorded specimen measuring feet (m), but it is not the longest of its genus.

Comparison Chart of Tantilla hobartsmithi - Smith's Black-headed Snake and Tantilla planiceps - Western Black-headed Snake. From Contra Costa County south to San Diego County Western Black-headed Snakes and Ring-necked Snakes might be found in the same location.

Colubrid, any member of the most common family of snakes, Colubridae, characterized by the complete absence of hind limbs, the absence or considerable reduction of the left lung, and the lack of teeth on the premaxilla and usually having a loose facial structure, relatively few head scales, and ventral scales as wide as the are approximately 1, species of colubrids, and they.

When a Spanish speaker says "culebra", though, they're probably referring to an animal of the Colubridae family, that is, a colubrid. In fact, the majority of snakes belong to this family, which contains around species.

The Colubrid family consists of many harmless, medium-sized species such as the viperine water snake (Natrix maura) or the ladder snake (Rhinechis scalaris). With most colubrid snakes, the head is covered by large, plate-like scales; With these similarities aside, members of the Colubridae family of snakes are incredibly diverse.

The colubrid snakes come in a wide variety of sizes, colors, and characteristics. Some colubrids are ground-dwellers while others are almost entirely arboreal.

Coniophanes is part of Dipsadinae, a major colubrid clade that doesn’t really include any well known species, though the North American hognose snakes (Heterodon) are. A new colubrid species of the genus Tantilla from the dry forest of the northern Peruvian Andes is described on the basis of two specimens, which exhibit a conspicuous sexual dimorphism.

Tantilla tjiasmantoi sp. nov. represents the third species of the genus in Peru. The new species is easily distinguished from its congeners by the combination of scalation characteristics and the unusual Author: Claudia Koch, Pablo J. Venegas. The Captive Breeding of Colubrid Snakes This document, written by Steven T.

Osborne, was originally published as a 4 part series in the edition (Volume 4: Number 3,4,7, & 9) of the San Diego Herpetological Society Newsletter.This page lists all the documents used to compile these tables.

The symbols and numbers quoted on this page refer to any reference symbol or number in any of the microbiogeography of Colorado pages.lyre snake (mildly venomous snake with a lyre-shaped mark on the head; found in rocky areas from southwestern United States to Central America).

vine snake (slender arboreal snake found from southern Arizona to Bolivia). black-headed snake (small secretive ground-living snake; found from central United States to Argentina). sand snake (small North American burrowing snake).